Are We Ever Too Old to have Purpose in Life?

 

“Do not cast me off in the time of old age;  Do not forsake me when my strength fails.  “ Psalm 71:9

I saw a motto on a college sign recently that said   “Come find your purpose”.  Hopefully that is the idea when college age kids go to college, they do find what they like and/or learn some skills to guide them in finding their purpose in life.   Isn’t that something that we do throughout life though?  Maybe there are a few who always knew what they wanted to do; but many do not.  While your’re young as a child, you basically go to school, play, do chores, etc.  When you go to college, you have to figure out what you want to do for a living, what is your purpose?  A job or career becomes your purpose.  Marriage and children give you purpose also.  Are we ever too old to have a purpose or to serve God?

Is Age a Barrier for Serving?

I started searching around on the web and ran across some good encouragement and insight which I will be sharing here.  First of all,  I read at this site:  “Age is no barrier, no offense before the throne of God.  A willing heart is all He seeks….”        

The Bible never says anyone is too old for God, (nor does He say you are too young either) but there is no age limit on serving God that I can read or see anywhere.

“Everyone who is called by my name, And whom I created for My glory, Whom I have formed,  even whom I have made. ”  Isaiah 43:7    All you need to do is be called by God and be willing.    Whether we are old or young, we all still are here for a purpose.  As long as you are willing and available, God can use you no matter what the age.

Secondly, God used many in the Bible  who were older.  Moses was 80 before he began his most active service for God.  (Exodus 7:7)  Joshua died at 110 years old after helping the Israelites conquer their land. (Joshua 24:29) Abraham was 100 and Sarah 90 before they had Isaac. (Gen.17:17)    Zachariah and Elizabeth were very old before they had John the Baptist also.  (Luke 1:18)  Simeon and Anna both lived to old age serving in the temple, awaiting the birth of the Messiah. (Luke 2:25-38)

We know that Paul the Apostle called himself ‘the aged’ before he died and Apostle John wrote his works at the end of the first century. (Philemon 9, John, 1 John, Revelation).  Daniel the prophet served through quite a few kings in Babylonia and we know he was not young when he died.  Job lived to over 140 yrs. (Job 42:16)  Reading this assures me that age doesn’t stop you from having purpose or serving God.

What about present day?  Are people still out being active?  You can find them if you look.   Specifically looking at women,  I think of Mother Teresa, Corrie ten Boom, Catherine Booth, Hannah Moore who lived  to be 88, and even Anne Graham Lotz who is about 69  and serving as head of the National Day of Prayer Organization and has written books.  Those are just a very few examples.    We may retire from secular jobs but we do not retire from service or having a purpose in the later years of life.

Is Culture a Barrier?

FREEBIE SAMPLES: —->

Sometimes our problem in finding purpose maybe related to our youth-oriented culture. Wisdom and experience of the elderly are not appreciated and society is too quick to put those who are older ‘out to pasture.’  Other cultures reflect the scriptural norm where elderly are revered; wisdom and experience are appreciated.  They continue in roles of influence until death.  http://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/10-10-16-how-different-cultures-take-care-of-seniors/

Lastly consider, perhaps you think at retirement that you’ve already done your part in serving…..What’s left?  What lands are left to conquer?  (Josh. 13:1-7)  ‘Helping  hands’ needs are always present in the church, or sharing God’s love, sending cards or making phone calls or visiting the homebound,  Don’t forget children who’s love to hear your stories, younger women who need to be mentored, volunteering for a charity that you never had time to do before.   Blogging is another option that quite a few older people have started doing.  I will be sharing some of those other blogs soon for you to look at if you don’t already.

I know of one older lady who couldn’t walk and felt pretty useless the later years of her life.  She told me that the one thing she discovered she could do was smile at others when she was take out and about. She could only brighten someone’s day with a smile or encourage them, but it was the one thing she could do.  People enjoyed that smile!   If we are willing and available, God will bring opportunities our way, even if its just a smile or a kind word.

Other scriptures to consider:  2 Cor.3:5, Psalm 71:18,19; Isaiah 46:4, Psalm 92: 12-15, and Psalm 37:25 which says:

 “I have been young and now I am old; Yet I have not seen the righteous forsaken, Or his descendants begging bread.”

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A Place for Dad-Exploring Living Options

Even to your old age  and gray hairs I am he, I am he who will sustain you I have made you and I will carry you; I will sustain you and I will rescue you.  Isaiah 46:4

Hello there!

When you get to senior age, you may need to explore your living options.  You may decide to stay where you are, or downsize to a smaller place, join a living community, live with a relative, or have to stay in a facility where you can get the care and security you need if none of the above is an option.  As we get closer to that age, we are beginning to consider a few of those options. However, what about our older senior parents who are still alive? They are in that season right now.  How do you decide what options are best for your senior parents, or how do they decide what is best if they still are able?

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/aging/elder-care/5-senior-living-options1.htm

Living Options Dilemma

My dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s several years back.  He still lived alone in his own house at that time.  Since he was in the beginning stages,  he was not in imminent danger or anything.  Dad drove, cooked, cleaned house, dressed and cared for himself and his dog, and even went dancing at senior centers.  Hence, he was a fairly active senior citizen.

My siblings and I all lived several states away, however, we were concerned about dad and started doing research.  We explored living options and started to prepare ourselves for what was to come.  The doctor prescribed medication for Dad and he was doing well.  He kept his doctor appointments regularly and functioned as he always had.

Back in the eighties he had started driving the some 1800 miles to go see his kids.  We enjoyed his visits and were glad to see him.  When he developed Alzheimer’s, the trips became a source of anxiety for all of us.  He would start on a trip fine, but by the second day of driving he would get lost or pass out from low blood sugar.  Next, one of us would receive a call from the doctor or police station. Finally we planned which one of us was available to go pick him up and get him home. After a few days of visiting, he felt fine and had forgotten how he arrived.

We took him to visit houses and assisted living places in our area.  He seemed very open, but said he needed to sell his house first.   Much as we understood,  we offered to help, but he refused.  Eventually, we arranged for a neighbor(a retired nurse) to check on him everyday and take him a meal so we knew he’d be getting fed and have an idea he was doing okay.  This went on for a couple years.

Freebies examples:

Decision Time

One day my uncle(dad’s only living sibling)took my dad to a doctor appointment.  Dad could no longer legally drive at that point.  Since the doctor wasn’t happy with my dad’s communication skills; he evaluated further him for a  period of a few days.  Furthermore, they decided that my dad could no longer live alone.   Then my brother and uncle took steps to take care of dad’s needs.

Since we lived several states away, it took a while to find a place.  Even though the doctor preferred a memory care facility,  my brother found a place that would accept him in assisted living as they assessed him still capable of it.   As a result, we explored a few different options.

Should we move him to live with one of us?    Would a memory care or assisted living home be better?  Perhaps a smaller residential home that provided such care with fewer residents would work?  Could he keep his dog?   Would the VA help with expenses and how to get that started ?  What about dad’s house and vehicles and other belongings?  Finally,  what about medical care?  Since we needed input from someone else, both my brother and I did consult with someone to advise and do research based on what our needs were.  Consequently, the organization I used was called  A Place For Mom.

Probably some of you may have faced a similar situation and had to make choices on what was best for your aging parent.   What affected your decisions?   It is obvious that no one choice is best for all, each situation is a little different.  The parent’s health, mental condition, financial assets, and family support is different in each case.  I’d love to hear from some of you what worked for you and why.   Consequently here is a survey you might do to help out with the information posted in this blog. 

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/7BSXHKX

Thanks for your time!

“You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the things which you think you cannot do.”— Eleanor Roosevelt

 

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